GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS, Bielsko-Biała. Poland.

8th – 24th October 2021, 10.00 a.m. – 6.00 p.m.

You need tickets for the main exhibitions. Accompanying exhibitions – free entrance.

EXHIBITIONS IN 2019 (entrance with tickets)

Solo exhibitions of world renowned artists photographers from Europe, America, Australia, Africa.

Document, landscape, portrait, reportage, experiment.

Traditional photography and digital media.

Imre Benko (Hungary)

Horizon

Exhibition: B&B Photography Gallery, 1 Maja 12

Meeting with the Artist: Auditorium of WSA, Modrzewskiego 12 – AUTHORS’ MARATHON, 12th October, 10:00 a.m.

THE EXHIBITION

My panoramic photo essay is a visual meditation about my wanderings near and far. Photography is a trip, a form of understanding the world.
The photos were taken by the famous Russian Horizont camera.
The composition of the full, uncrossed frame is a great challenge.


Imre Benko

Born in 1943. He lives in Budapest. His main field of interest is the visual interpretation of the real life, is the characteristic documentary description of the man and his environment. Started photographing when he was twenty.
He was a press photographer with the Hungarian News Agency for 18 years, then principal contributor photographer for the „Képes 7” and „Európa” magazines, represented abroad by the Paris-based photo agency Wostok Press.
In 1975 and in 1978 he won gold medals at the World Press Photo.
Scholarships: Grant of the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund, Budapest Photography Grant, André Kertész Procreative Grant.
1988-2000 lecturer of documentary photo in Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design.
From 1993 freelance photographer and he is working several long time human life subjects.
Published nine photo essay books: „Steel Town”, „Grey Lights”, „Faces”, „Blues”, „Ways”, ”Twins”, „Horizon”, „Steel-Art” and his monograph: „Benkő Imre Élet-Mű”.
He has had more than seventy solo exhibitions and was featured in hundreds of group shows world-wide.
He is member of the Association of Hungarian Photographic Artists and the Hungarian Academy of Arts.
Many meaningful collection, gallery and private collectors have his works.
Awards: Balázs Béla Prize, Pulitzer Memorial Prize, Excellent Artist of the Hungarian Republic, Hungarian Photography Grand Prix, Prima Primissima-prize.

Pavel Breier (Slovakia)

….tytuł….

Exhibition: Bielska BWA Gallery, 1 Maja 11

Meeting with the Artist: Auditorium of WSA, Modrzewskiego 12 – AUTHORS’ MARATHON, 12th October, 10:55 a.m.

 

THE EXHIBITION

Pavol Breier has been interested in the colorful life surrounding Slovak shepherd´s huts for over forty years.  He began documenting the life of shepherds as a student at FAMU and continues to do so even today. His interest has resulted in an extensive cycle of images of this significant part of Slovak traditional culture. It presents pictures from the life of shepherds, particularly in Slovakia. Most importantly, they have selected a different approach to life than most. They are more dependent on themselves and left themselves, they are frequently confronted with social isolation and human lonliness, but they feel no need to keep up with the majority, they have more space for personal independence. They do not live by an ordinary way to behave at atypical environment. They fight back distress by bottle, they watch TV together and their dogs are actually „the best friends of a man“.

Breier´s photos from the shepherds life are documentary and dynamically balanced. His photographic work is based on matter of facts. Pavol Breier, the documentary photographer – ethnologist, convincingly demonstrates that life programs and philosophy are more important than local traditions and ethnic boundaries. He dedicates his work to the subject of mountain people in Slovakia and often in the Himalayas, too.

                                                                         Marián Pauer

Pavel Breier

Born in 1952 in Bratislava. He graduated from the Prague Film Academy of the Performing Arts (FAMU).
Ever since the end of the 1970s he has been regularly producing cycles of photographs featuring mountain regions, concentrating thematically on the life of people in the mountains and on mountain landscapes and wildlife (cycles about Orava, the Pamirs, Himalayas, Tibet and other regions).
He has often presented his work at group or solo exhibitions and he is the author or co-author of a number of photographic publications (e.g. The Pamirs, The Little and White Carpathians, On the Roof of the World, The world of Tibetan Buddhism, Labrang: The Universe of a Tibetan Monastery, Shepherds).
He teaches photography at the Pan European University and at Comenius University in  Bratislava, Slovakia.
As a mountaineer, he participated on a number expeditions to the highest mountains as the Himalayas, Caucasus, The Pamirs, etc.

Koldo Chamorro (Spain)

Jesus Christ

Exhibition: STARA FABRYKA (OLD FACTORY), Plac Żwirki i Wigury 8

Meeting with the Artist: Auditorium of WSA, Modrzewskiego 12 – AUTHORS’ MARATHON, 12th October, 11:50 a.m.

THE EXHIBITION

This is probably the project on which he reflected the most, and for which he engaged in the most profound introspection and analysis of his own personal circumstances. Koldo meditates from within a family structure rooted in tradition and religion. The author considered this project finished upon the Catholic Church’s 2000 Great Jubilee. His interest was not to photographically preserve this supposedly dying heritage but to engage in an in-depth social analysis which would reveal the contradictions of a country that was weighted down by backwardness and obscurantism yet was swiftly hurtling forward towards modernity.
Koldo Chamorro worked as a professional photographer for over 35 years, during which he embarked on multiple projects revolving around issues like social structures, religion, festivals, bullfighting, the body and sex, almost always in the guise of series of ‘photographic essays’ developed over many years, in which he tried to unpack the keys to the topics he depicted.
He was a curious, empathetic, unpredictable artist, an implacable critic, observant, tenacious, passionate and meticulous. Now, ten years after his death, his unearthed pictures suddenly seem new, released from an unmerited exile and an incomprehensible abandonment. They are reincarnated and arranged not to smooth the terrain so we feel more comfortable but to destabilise, disturb and make us question time and time again what we are doing here and what will remain of us after we are gone.

Koldo Chamorro

Koldo Chamorro viewed photography essentially as documentation, and the essence of documentation is identity, especially one’s own. In the waning years of the Franco regime, Koldo—just like other photographers from his generation—understood that there were certain religious manifestations and popular festivities which were on the verge of disappearing, because the political changes and the march of globalisation would presumably cast them into oblivion. For this reason, in 1974 he began the series The Iberian Holy Christ, a photographic essay which he envisioned as a large-scale, long-term, monographic project that sought to visually reflect on the different aspects of the Christian liturgies and expressions on the Iberian Peninsula, as well as on the effects of the Christian cross on our social landscape.
Exhibited in Poland for the first time.

 

Christian Coigny (Switzerland)

….tytuł….

Exhibition: Ryenk 7 Gallery, Rynek 7

Meeting with the Artist: Auditorium of WSA, Modrzewskiego 12 – AUTHORS’ MARATHON, 12th October, 12:45 p.m.

THE EXHIBITION

You know the famous sentence « a picture is worth a thousand words » nevertheless  I can clearly declare that the older I get the more difficult it becomes to make a good picture;  It’s hard to admit that the yearly crop of good picture reduces itself to one or two; not more.
I have quit commercial photography for some various reasons – first because digital really   became the only way to continue and the world of digital, computers, etc. was  for me impossible to penetrate; second – for fa ew years I had some great assistants who did all the work for me, like retouching, etc., etc.  Now the style of photography changed and I was not too interested in working with models, hairdressers, stylists.
I go to my studio every day, even if I don’t feel like it. I am like a  man in love with someone he hasn’t met yet, and stays at a street corner every day in case she would pass by. That’s exactly why I go every day to my studio to be there in case the creative lightning would strike. And it does work, but requires much patience, much courage to face deception , some times days of discouragement.
Now, I love the darkroom work and I like to think that my photos haven’t been retouched, because it’s impossible to retouch gelatine silver prints. And I like people to know that what they see is what I have seen, without retouching.

Christian Coigny

Born in 1946 in Lausanne. He works mainly in advertising in the United States and Switzerland. At the same time, he carries out personal work exclusively in silver and black and white photography on the themes of portraiture, nude, landscape and still life.
He entered the Vevey vocational training center at the photography school where he learned graphic design and composition. He left school after only 8 months and left, in 1969 , to learn photography on his own in San Francisco in the United States by working on advertising campaigns including those of the Levi’s brand for 2 years.
After another year in Brazil devoted to fashion photography, he returned to Switzerland and collaborated with the magazine Annabelle in Zurich.
Back in Lausanne, he opened his own studio and focused mainly on still life, fashion and portraiture. Maison Bongénie Grieder noticed her work and entrusted it with its poster campaigns for more than ten years.
He worked for Chopard, Hermès, Hublot  Baume and Mercier 3, Champagne Krug 4, Kredit Bank 5, Widder Jazz 6 or Ferretti yachts. He collaborated with the Swiss magazine Annabelle as well as Le Nouveau Quotidien and the magazine Vogue Germany.
Today he devotes most of his time to his personal work around nudes, portraits, landscapes and still lives which he presents in various galleries and museums in Europe.
In 1983, the Favre publishing house entrusted him with the creation of a book of portraits of Swiss personalities. From 1987 to 1997, Christian Coigny made multiple round trips between Europe and the United States to photograph more than 130 personalities from the cultural world seated on Vitra furniture. Among them, Jerry Lewis, Keith Haring, Jeanne Moreau, Roy Lichtenstein, Ringo Starr, Barbara Hendricks, Maurice Béjart, Jean Nouvel, Miles Davis, John Malkovich.
He exhibited in prestigious museums and galleries all over the world, published a few important books, and received noble prizes.
Exhibited in Poland for the first time.

Tuck Fauntleroy (USA)

….tytuł….

Exhibition: Regional Cultural Centre, 1 Maja 8

Meeting with the Artist: Auditorium of WSA, Modrzewskiego 12 – AUTHORS’ MARATHON, 12th October, 1:40 p.m.

THE EXHIBITION

Waterline
This series allows the viewer access to remote locations and rare conditions that most would never see otherwise. Utilizing rivers as subject matter, strong visual lines are accentuated by snow-covered earth from an aerial perspective. The images visually displace the viewer, pushing the boundaries of realism and abstraction through compositions of positive and negative space. The photographic approach emphasizes simplicity and stability.
This series of images results from taking fight over the American West for the last decade to capture rivers at a critical moment in the spring. Works in this series are connected by the intentionality of photographing landscapes devoid of human interruption. Noting the transitional progressions in these remote locations, the photographs express a deeply human desire to capture and chase the ephemerality of seasons and time.
The imagery takes something fluid yet temporary in time and space and visually grounds it for silence and reflection. Detailed mapping, critical timing and an elevated point of view come together to form a graphic aesthetic in this contemporary study of landscapes.

Elements
Three years in the making, Fauntleroy has spent his time chasing this capricious moment and the colossal beauty realized as water changes from a liquid to a solid-state as winter approaches in autumn.
Fauntleroy’s fascination with how color is absorbed and reflected by water in its various states, lead him to pursue this new body of work. The result is astonishing. Depicting the raw color variations found in the natural palette of H2O, Elements amazes the viewer by revealing colors found in nature that one is rarely exposed to. Each image engulfs the viewer into a mysterious environment- one that seems familiar yet out of reach. Standing in front of these large photographs one becomes lost in a visual journey rendered almost painterly in one frame and conjuring minimalist constructivism or organic patterns viewed through a microscope in the next. Both art and architecture, science and nature, Fauntleroy’s work pauses the active molecules in water and allows us to reflect on the true shape, color, and form of water.

Tuck Fauntleroy

Tuck Fauntleroy (b.1978, Easton, Maryland) lives and works in Jackson Hole. After receiving his B.A. from Bucknell University in 2000, he moved West and has been rooted in Wyoming since. Inspired by the natural environment of the Eastern Shore of Maryland and the small waterfront town where he was raised, Fauntleroy’s art often finds its way in the medium of water.
Early influence based in traditions of the coastal culture of the Chesapeake Bay expand to new photographic discovery within Wyoming’s vast, largely uninhabited ecosystems.
Combined with his personal photographic practice, Fauntleroy has developed a professional foundation as a photographer in the fields of architecture and interior design over the past 20 years. His work is published in recognized outlets such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, Dwell, Conde Nast Traveler, Newsweek, Powder Magazine, Ski, The Fly Fish Journal, Mountain Living, Range, and Town & Country.

Ugur Gallengus (Turkey)

Parallel Universes of Children

Exhibition: TO TU GALLERY, Wzgórze 2

Meeting with the Artist: AUDITORIUM OF WSA, Modrzewskiego 12 – AUTHORS’ MARATHON, 12th October, 5:45 p.m.

THE EXHIBITION

The exhibition bears witness to the true price children pay for our world’s inequalties Turkish artist Ugur Gallenkus brings global attention to the injustices affecting children through the poignant, heart-wrenching collages.
Gallenkuş considers his art a humanitarian endeavor as well as an aesthetic one. The collages draw from a range of source material, including the work of some of today’s most intrepid photojournalists. The artist touchingly depicts a range of intensely relevant issues affecting today’s children: from hunger to poverty, child trafficking, child labor, child soldier, immigration, healthcare, and education in this exhibition.
The exhibition is based on the artist’s first book: Parallel Universes of Children. The book was published by Ugur’s manager – Arzu Tunca – in November 2020 in honor of World Children’s Day. The book takes the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Children, enforced since 1989, as its foundation, aiming to convey the essential rights each child should have, regardless of their circumstances or geography. Each collage represents one of the U.N.- determined rights of children and is accompanied by statistics indicating the pressing realities. This data reminds us that we all share responsibility for making our world better.

Ugur Gallengus

Born in 1990 in Niğde, Turkey. He lives and works in Istanbul. He graduated from Anadolu University’s Department of Business Administration.
His work has been featured in Juxtapoz Magazine, DIY Photography, and My Modern Met and the reach and visibility of his project continues to grow. He exhibited at the Bifoto Fest in Sardinia, Italy and has exhibition scheduled in France, Italy, and Poland, as well as in Turkey.
Because his collages push for change and raise awareness, he often collaborates with aid and advocacy organizations. Gallenkuş recently collaborated with philanthropist Dominik Kulczyk of the Kulczyk Foundation to paint seven murals in Warsaw, Krakow, Lodz, Wroclaw, Gdansk.
Additionally, he has collaborated with United Nations on projects about multiple occasions. The United Nations Development Program used five of his collages for a social media campaign, and, during the global COVID-19 crisis, in 2020 he crafted collages for the U.N. Sustainable Development campaign, highlighting the relationship between health, social and economic inequalities, and climate change.

Jan Grarup (Denmark)

And then there was Silence

Exhibition: SFERA II GALLERY, Mostowa 5 (2nd floor)

Meeting with the Artist: AUDITORIUM OF WSA, Modrzewskiego 12 – AUTHORS’ MARATHON, 12th October, 6:40 p.m.

THE EXHIBITION

His images of the Rwandan and Darfur genocides provide incontrovertible evidence of unthinkable human brutality, in the hope that such events will never happen again. His work, The Boys from Ramallah and The Boys from Hebron, covers both sides of the Intifada expressed through the lives of children coming of age amidst the violence. Grarup’s work takes the viewer to the limits of human despair, dignity, suffering and hope. His images are relevant to us all, because they form a chronicle of the time in which we live, but at times do not dare to recognize.

Jan Grarup

Born on 1968. He has over the course of his 25-year career photographed many of recent history’s defining human rights and conflict issues. Grarup’s work reflects his belief in photojournalism’s role as an instrument of witness and memory to incite change, and the necessity of telling the stories of people who are rendered powerless to tell their own.
Grarup has been honored with many of the most prestigious awards from the photography industry and human rights organizations, including:8 World Press Photo awards, UNICEF, W. Eugene Smith Foundation for Humanistic Photography, Oskar Barnack award,  POYi and NPPA. In 2005 he was awarded with a Visa d’Or at the Visa Pour l’Image photo festival in France, for his coverage of Darfur’s refugee crisis.

Nick Hannes (Belgium)

Garden of Delight

Exhibition: SFERA II GALLERY, Mostowa 5 (2nd floor)

THE EXHIBITION

Nick Hannes travelled to Dubai five times between 2016 and 2018 in order to put his reservations and prejudices about the city to the test. It quickly became clear that Dubai represented the extreme form of the topics that he had been tackling for years. The city was a case study in breakneck, market-driven urbanisation; without limits or ethics; or, to put it another way, Dubai was an out-of-control entertainment hall, meticulously designed to serve unbridled consumerism.
Hannes’ photographs function as a razor-sharp knife that uses humour and irony to slice through this metropolis of the future. What remains, in the words of the Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas, is a “Generic City”, without history, personality or identity; a city that is “indifferent to its inhabitants”. To Hannes, it is a place where “human activities are reduced to their economic value”.

The Netherlandish painter Hieronymous Bosch painted his iconic triptych Garden of Earthly Delights over 500 years ago. The central panel depicts a false paradise, right before the Fall. It is a dystopian image to which Hannes – from his outsider position – likes to refer. He reveals Dubai as a Theatrum Mundi, at times with dismay, at others with dumbfoundedness, but always with a desire to understand. Is a model like Dubai economically and socially sustainable – or are we still, 500 years after Bosch, living in the same ill-omened theatre of the world?

Joachim Naudts

Nick Hannes

Born in 1974 in Antwerp. He studied photography at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts (KASK) in Ghent. After 8 years of doing assignments as a photojournalist, he decided to fully concentrate on self-initiated documentary projects. His work is documentary and socially critical, and has a strong socio-political slant. Using humour, irony and visual metaphors, he focuses on the problematic relationship between man and his environment.
Nick published 3 books: ‘Red Journey’ (Lannoo 2009) deals with the transitional phase in post-communist society. ‘Mediterranean. ‘The Continuity of Man’ (Hannibal 2014) focuses on various contemporary issues such as mass-tourism, urbanization, migration and crises of various kinds in the Mediterranean region. ‘Garden of Delight’ (Hannibal/André Frère Editions, 2018) showcases Dubai as the ultimate playground of globalization and capitalism, and raises questions about authenticity and sustainability.
‘Garden of Delight’, was awarded the Magnum Photography Award in 2017 and the Zeiss Photography Award in 2018.
Nick exhibited at FotoMuseum Antwerp, Fotofestiwal Lodz, Organ Vida Zagreb, Photolux Lucca, Stadtische Galerie Iserlohn, Centro Andaluz de la Fotografia Almeria, Triennial of Photography Hamburg, Photomed (Beirut), FotoIstanbul among others.
Since 2008 he teaches documentary photography at KASK/The School of Arts in Ghent. Hannes is represented by Panos Pictures in London.

Tomoya Imamura (Hungary – Japan – Germany)

Petőfi’s Corpse

Exhibition: PPP ART GALLERY, Rynek 27

Meeting with the Artist: AUDITORIUM OF WSA, ul. Modrzewskiego 12 – AUTHORS’ MARATHON, 13th October, 10:00 a.m.

THE EXHIBITION

The exhibition attempts to describe a Hungarian present whose post-socialist reality nourishes a new form of nationalism. A people who have been oppressed for centuries, whose culture and education has centred around the history of said oppression, is searching for a new enemy to blame in this new free, but unfair world.
This image series combines documentary photography and staged images, though it remains unclear how much manipulation took place in each picture. Part of this staging are paper-m.ch. objects, which represent communist, as well as Hungarian national symbolism. They serve as a white projection surface or burntout form. For outsiders, they are almost the only direct reference to Hungary, although the national symbolism depicted does not provide more information about Hungary than the occasional Hungarian-language lettering. The location thus remains in Eastern Europe and emphasizes the communist veil that poured the former Eastern bloc into uniform concrete.
The 1kg-loaf of bread is a reccuring element in the series. It is a standardized remnant of the socialist system, but also draws a parallel to the „body of christ“ and the religious aspects of the right-wing-movement. Connected to the work‘s title it highlights Sandor Petőfi as a national „messiah“, whose death is just as unclear, as the evolution of Hungary‘s historical self image.

Tomoya Imamura

Born in 1991 in Duisburg. Bachelor of Arts at the Communication Design Folkwang Universität der Künste in Essen. Took the ERASMUS-Semester at the Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design in Budapest. Got his Master of Arts in photography at Folkwang Universität der Künste.
Author of many exhibitions organised in Germany, Poland, Switzerland.
Finalist of the Verzasca Foto Award in 2019 and European Photoaward.
His work combines a documentary approach with staged imagery, mostly around the topic of ideology and the right-wing movement in Europe.
Juul Kraijer’s current work is supported with a Stipendium Established Artists from the Dutch Mondriaan Foundation.

Bernard Larsson (Germany)

Berlin in 1960s

Installation: STARA FABRYKA (OLD FACTORY), Plac Żwirki i Wigury 8

INSTALACJA

Larsson‘s work belongs to the School of Humanist Photography which developed at the end of World War II. His camera serves him as a tool to understand the world and to narrate it. After the terror of the war it was important for the young photographers to help construct a new Europe.
News of the construction of the Berlin Wall on August 13th 1961 provokes Larsson to leave Paris and move to Berlin. Due to his Swedish passport he can move freely without any restrictions around all four zones of Berlin, all under Allied martial law. Larsson succeeds in capturing both the humani¬tarian and political situation of the divided city. This is reflected in his photographs of its inhabitants and their everyday lives. In 1964 his book ‘Berlin: The Complete City – Political Photographs’ (Die ganze Stadt Berlin – politische Fotos), accompanied by text by Michel Butor, is published.

Bernard Larsson

Born in 1939 in Hamburg, grew up both in Sweden and the Federal Republic of Germany. In 1957 he studied photography in Munich. In 1959 he moved to Paris, where he became the personal assistant to famous William Klein.
Larsson also travels to fascist Spain and the former French colony – Morocco. Later, in 1968, shortly after the violent suppression of liberalization by the troops of the Warsaw Pact, he travels to Prague and further to Warsaw and Budapest.
From 1966–68 Larsson works as a photojournalist for Stern magazine. In addition to his editorial work he follows the activities of the APO (extra-parliamentary opposition) around the student Rudi Dutschke, and also the setting up of Kommune 1 (K 1).
In 1967 Larsson’s photographic documentation of students’ revolts in Berlin appears in Voltaire Flugschriften. In 1970 he works with Thomas Neumann and Esta Marshall to create an eight part documentary film about the social history of photography (Stilgeschichte der Fotografie) for German public television (WDR). Since then he has been a photographer for fashion and advertising. Bernard Larsson now lives in Munich.

Misha Maslennikov (Russia)

Don Steppe

Exhibition: “KUBISZÓWKA” CULTURAL CENTRE, ul. Słowackiego 17

THE EXHIBITION

Picture yourself in the midst of the steppe, somewhere out in the open, looking at the horizon. You find your gaze drawn beyond this meeting of earth and sky, to the far side of the visible, so much that you can see nothing other than this inexorable boundary. What’s out there? What kind of life beyond? You stand there for a while in silence, just a bit longer, and all this falls away. There is only the earth under your feet, near and far, as far as the eye can see, and the sky above your head, around you and about you, and it all runs together as one, even within you, and it’s as if there is no longer an observer. And you want to understand, you long to glimpse the sense of it, to unravel the riddle of nature, in yourself and in the creation around you, to suddenly grasp why you ended up here. There was something else…

Ah yes, it’s time to head home. You whistle to the dog, who’s tagged along for the walk, you gather the cut reeds from the ravine at the bend in the river to repair the roof, you bring in water and firewood, and you water the garden. Then you fix the sagging fence of the livestock pen, you feed the chickens and the pigs, you meet the herd of cows coming in from pasture and urge them into the cowshed. What else? There’s never any lack of chores on the farm. Milk the cows, clean the fish, prepare the leavening for the bread. You don’t neglect the cats, but they would have been sure to remind you of themselves in any case.

Misha Maslennikov

Born in 1964 in the settlement of Dobroe close to Moscow. Since 2013 constantly lives in the city of Odessa, Ukraine.
Since the middle of 2005 Misha goes in for field reportage photography and begins thinking seriously about the photographic process as a way of the particular conveyance of author ideas in a missionary vein. The main areas are single expeditions to the places difficult of access, visiting and co-operation with cenobites of active monasteries, sketes, with keepers of ancient temples, pogosts, studying the way of life of modern hermits, anchorites, real intercourse and contacts with backwoodsmen.
At present Misha Maslennikov continues his work on private and public projects in documentary photography, individual and group expeditions according to a given subject, collection of materials, visual ethnography.
Exhibited in Poland for the first time.

Anders Petersen (Sweden )

City Diary

Exhibition: STARA FABRYKA (OLD FACTORY), pl. Żwirki i Wigury 8

Meeting with the artist: AUDITORIUM OF WSA, Modrzewskiego 12 – AUTHORS’ MARATHON, 13th October, 11:50 a.m.

THE EXHIBITION

 

Anders Petersen

He was born 1944 in Stockholm.
In 1961 he stayed for some time in Hamburg in order to learn German and trying to write and paint. He didn’t take any pictures.
Five years later he met Christer Strömholm and became a student at his School of Photography in Stockholm. Strömholm was not just his teacher but also a close friend. Their friendship influenced him for life.
In 1967 he starts photographing a bar called Café Lehmitz in Hamburg. He was photographing there for a period of almost 3 years and in 1970 he had his first solo exhibition over the bar in Café Lehmitz with 350 photographs nailed to the wall.
In 1973 he published his first book “Gröna Lund”, about people in an amusement park in Stockholm. In 1974 he graduated from the Swedish Filmschool, Dramatiska Institutet, in Stockholm. In 1978 he published “Café Lehmitz ” in Germany.
In 1984 the first book in a trilogy about locked institutions was published. The three books were about people in a prison, nursing house, and mental hospital. After photographing the mental hospital for three years he oriented himself towards a more free approach in a kind of diary like photography.

During 2003 and 2004 Anders Petersen was appointed Professor of Photography in the School of Photography and Film at the University of Göteborg, Sweden. He regularly has workshops and exhibitions throughout Europe, Asia and in the USA. He has received numerous grants and rewards since the seventies.
In 2003 Petersen was elected the “Photographer of the Year” by the International Photofestival in Arles.
In 2006 he was shortlisted for the “Deutsche Börse Photography Prize”.
In 2007 he received the “Special Prize of the Jury” for his exhibition “Exaltation of Humanity” by the third International Photofestival in Lianzhou, China.
In 2008 he received the “Dr. Erich Salomon Award” by Deutsche Gesellschaft für Photographie, Germany.
“The Arles Contemporary Book Award for 2009” went to JH Engström and Anders Petersen’s collaborative book “From Back Home” by Max Ström. The book was nominated to “The Best Photographic Book in Sweden, year 2009” and also Winner of Design Bronze Lion in Cannes.
In 2010, he was in the jury for the BMW Prize at Paris Photo.
In 2012, nominated to the Swedish Photo Book Prize in Stockholm for “SOHO”, and PhotoBook of the Year award for ”City Diary”Paris Photo and the Aperture Foundation.
Anders Petersen has his darkroom in Stockholm, Sweden.

Avani Rai (India)

Daily Life

Exhibition: STARA FABRYKA (OLD FACTORY), pl. Żwirki i Wigury 8

Meeting with the Artist: AUDITORIUM OF WSA, ul. Modrzewskiego 12 – AUTHORS’ MARATHON, 13th October, 5:20 p.m.

THE EXHIBITION

As a photographer she has contributed to the Sunday Guardian, Scroll, The Wire and is currently spends most her time in Kashmir, documenting this politically complicated region and its people.

Avani Rai

Based out of Mumbai, India, Avani Rai works as a cameraperson on a number of short fiction and documentary films. Her most recent film: Raghu Rai-An Unframed Portrait, directed and shot by her and co-produced by Arte France, IDFA Bertha Fund premiered at IDFA in z competition in November 2017.

His photographs have been shown at many individual and collective exhibitions, including the Multimedia Art Museum in Moscow or the Beniaki Museum in Athens. Has received many international awards, his works were published, among others, in National Geographic, The Guardian, TIME and New York Magazine.

Walter Schels (Germany)

Humanimal

Exhibition: BIELSKA BWA GALLERY, ul. 3 Maja 11

Meeting with the Artist: AUDITORIUM OF WSA, Modrzewskiego 12 – AUTHORS’ MARATHON, 13th October, 1:40 p.m.

THE EXHIBITION

We humans have shared our living space with animals for thousands of years. For us, animals are a source of food, reliable helpers, companions, the subject of stories, myths and images. But what goes on in their heads? Do animals have a psyche, thoughts, feelings like us? How similar are we?
Astonished and strangely touched, we find ourselves confronted with animal faces that remind us of human features. The decadence in the cat’s face, the melancholy in the monkey’s eyes, the attentiveness in the elephant’s gaze. The connections we make are reminiscent of the dialectic of essence and appearance, which was anticipated for humans by the physiognomists of the 18th century and which Schels made the basis of his images of humans and animals.

 “At first, I used human portraits as models for my work with animals, but that soon changed. For my portraits of people, I wanted „animal-like“ faces without poses and superfluous smiles, without the implied question: „How do I look?“

Most of the celebrities are experienced in front of a camera. They smile automatically. Part of my work is to photograph that smile away. Animals do not recognize their mirror images and presumably do not worry about their appearance. I found this attitude of self-acceptance most often in the very old – and in babies, who are completely unaware of what they look like.
Yet people and animals are related and animals want to be loved as well. Their well-developed instinct enables them to determine very quickly whether they are liked or not.
Dogs, cats, and many other animals are not the least bit shy about displaying their feelings. Perhaps that is why we sometimes think we recognize a carefully hidden part of our own inner selves in an animal‘s expression.

Walter Schels

Born 1936, is a passionate portraitist and photographic researcher of physiognomy. He has worked with personalities such as Andy Warhol, the Dalai Lama, Yehudi Menuhin or Angela Merkel. Schels, who grew up with cats, dogs, pigs and chickens, has photographed the animals like people: in his studio, using a large-format camera, with great earnestness and a deep desire to capture the very essence of his counterpart with the camera.
Until the 1960s, he worked as a window dresser for large fashion houses in Barcelona, Canada and Geneva. He then went to New York, where his career goal was to become a fashion photographer.
In 1970, Schels returned to Germany and opened a studio. For many years he photographed international campaigns for companies such as PanAm, Lufthansa, L’Oréal, or BMW and fashion spreads and editorial contributions for major magazines.
At the beginning of the 1990s, Schels increasingly devoted himself to his own artistic projects. A key experience for him was an assignment for the magazine “Eltern”: in 1974 he photographed a birth for the magazine.
In photographic series and long-term projects, Schels has devoted himself for many years to observing extreme situations of human existence. He has taken portraits of blind people, artists in a workshop for the disabled, prematurely born children, transsexual youths and hospice patients before and after death.
Walter Schels has lived and worked in Hamburg since 1990. He has published numerous books, his works have been shown in exhibitions at home and abroad and are part of important art collections.

Gregg Segal (USA)

Instant Archeology: The Culture of Food and Waste

Exhibition: GALLERY, 11 Listopada 24

THE EXHIBITION

Ever since I was a kid, I’ve wondered why we produce so much garbage. Part of the problem is that the products and toys we buy aren’t made to last the way they once were. Companies need to sell you new refrigerators and microwaves and cars and smart phones every few years in order to be profitable and to grow. Economic growth fuels waste.
But is it only the fault of our economic model? Are we merely victims? It isn’t our fault that we come home from the grocery store with a load of plastic and packaging that goes straight into the trash, is it?
In 2014, I asked family, friends, neighbors and other acquaintances to save their trash for a week and then lie down and be photographed in it. I created the settings for the pictures in my backyard in Altadena, California: water, forest, beach, snow; no natural environment is safe from trash. Some question why I counted recyclables as garbage. Sadly, much of what we think is recyclable doesn’t get recycled.
Every year, 8 million tons of plastic end up in our oceans. Many cities have done away with their recycling programs because they’re too costly and inefficient. And China won’t take our garbage anymore. But the main reason I included recyclables in these portraits is because they illustrate a fundamental change in our relationship to food. We’ve grown dependent on the industries of eating and cooking and the result has been a massive increase in waste.
I began to wonder, how have diets have been impacted by this revolution in the way food is produced and consumed? It struck me that we don’t give enough thought to what’s in our food because we’re not the ones making it. We’ve outsourced the most vital ingredient of life, the connective tissue of families and culture. We often choose foods that are ready-made, inexpensive and satiating, but not very nutritious.
I thought, what if we kept a journal of everything we eat and drink for one week to bring our focus onto diet and health and take ownership of the foods we eat.
Beginning with kids made sense because eating habits start young.
In 2016, I began making my way around the world, photographing children surrounded by the foods they eat in one week. I’ve found that we’re at a tipping point. The balance of what most kids eat is dramatically tipping away from homemade stews and vegetables towards ultra-processed packaged foods and snacks, many of them designed to appeal to children.
Still, I’ve been encouraged to find regions and communities where home cooked meals remain the bedrock of family and culture and where love and pride are sensed in the aromas of stews and curries. The more we prepare our own meals from whole foods, the less trash we generate which is not only pleasing to the eye but easy on the environment.
There’s an old adage, “The hand that stirs the pot rules the world.” When the hand stirring the pot is more concerned with profit than in our well being or the well being of the planet, it’s time we insist on healthier options and whenever possible, stir our own pots.

Gregg Segal

Gregg Segal

Gregg Segal studied photography and film at California Institute of the Arts (BFA) dramatic writing at New York University (MFA) and education at The University of Southern California (MA).
Segal’s photography has been recognized by American Photography, Communication Arts, PDN, PX3, Investigative Reporters and Editors, The New York Press Club, the Society of Publication Designers, Lens Culture, and the Magnum Photography Awards.
He is the recipient of the 2018 Food Sustainability Media Award sponsored by Thomson Reuters and the Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition Foundation.
Segal’s portraiture and photo essays have been featured in Time, GEO, Smithsonian, The Independent, Le Monde, Fortune, National Geographic Adventure and Wired, among others. His first monograph Daily Bread was published by Powerhouse Books in 2019 and a German edition of Daily Bread was released in 2020.
Segal’s next book, Generation Z, a collaboration with food anthropologist Richard Delerins, will be released in the fall of 2021 by the French publisher Robert Laffont.

Livio Senigalliesi (Italy)

Side Effects

Exhibition: “KUBISZÓWKA” CULTURAL CENTRE, Słowackiego 17

THE EXHIBITION

The 1970s were dominated by political ideals, pacifism and anti-war sentiments. This issue has been important for my generation and I believe that I became a war photographer to live on the ground my commitment against war, against violence and death.
For a few years I dealt with social issues in Italy, then I devoted myself to Eastern European countries. Living long periods in countries under Soviet occupation allowed me to understand many things and to learn German and Russian culture and Slavic languages.

When the Berlin Wall fell in November 1989, I was already there. I was based in East Berlin. I had a rare accreditation that allowed me to travel and photograph in the GDR. I was lucky enough to document a Country (GDR) that was changing forever and those photos have become History.
I was in the right place at the right time. I began to collaborate with major international newspapers and to experience history as it happens.
Then I moved to Moscow. In the days of the coup (summer 1991), I was inside the Kremlin where President Gorbachev was arrested by KGB agents. Boris Yeltsin came to power and the powerful Soviet Union melted like snow in the sun.
In 1991 the conflict in Yugoslavia broken out and the war crossed my path. It was a hard, devastating experience that took my whole life and all my energies. There was no more room for love and normal life. Death entered my head, my heart and I lived for years as in a dark tunnel… I started living like an animal in destroyed houses, in cellars like rats, in trenches with soldiers.
I lost the sense of a normal life. I can’t forget Sarajevo and the other bloody places where I spent 10 fucking years of my life. Cold, hunger and fear were everyday problems.
The sacrifices were enormous but I get satisfaction because my photographs were published all over in the world. During some breaks in the war in Yugoslavia, I had numerous assignments to cover Rwanda’ genocide in 1994, the war in Chechnya, Palestine, Lebanon, Sudan, Afghanistan and Iraq. I became a specialist…

I’ ve got many awards and organized hundreds of traveling exhibitions.
Such a risky life cost me a lot. I suffer from a post traumatic syndrome (PTSD). The nights are full of nightmares.
I have been exposed to pain for too long. Too many dead, too much suffering.
Now it’s time to transfer my experiences to the students of journalism and to write a memoir because everyone must know the cruelty and the legacy of war.
Exhibited in Poland for the first time.

Livio Senigalliesi

I became a photographer by chance. I grew up in a poor family in an industrial area of Milan in the north of Italy. My destiny was to be a factory worker. After military service, a friend asked me to assist him in the photographic studio and so my life had an unexpected turn.
When I was young I loved reading adventure books, stories of people living in other continents who have different cultures … So, with the first earnings, I began to dream of making travel a profession. With great humility I approached reportage, social photography studying the technique of the great photographers of the past and those reporters who documented the Vietnam War.

 

Wolf Suschitzki (Austria)

….tytuł….

Exhibition: STARA SFERA II GALLERY, Mostowa 5 (2nd floor)

Meeting with the Artist: AUDITORIUM OF WSA, Modrzewskiego 12 – AUTHORS’ MARATHON, 13th October, 3:30 p.m.

THE EXHIBITION

 

Wolf Suschitzki

 

David Tesinsky (Czech Republic)

Life is good

Exhibition: BIELSKA BWA GALLERY, 3 Maja 11

THE EXHIBITION

The exhibition is a satirical series with aim to kill daily stereotypes and keep open eyes.
I’m searching for controversial or somehow special lifestyles and destinies all around the world.

David Tesinsky

I started photography in 2006. My pictures are being published by some world’s major media such as The Guardian, VICE, VANITY FAIR, Le Monde, Spiegel, Stern, The Huff Post, and more.
I’ve done solo and been part of group exhibitions all around Europe and the United States and also the Middle East.
I got awarded six times in Czech Press Photo, Sony World Photography, got nominated by World Press Photo, and some more.
I was teaching photography and photojournalism at Prague College in 2018.

Pham Huy Trung (Vietnam)

My Vietnam

Exhibition: BIELSKA BWA GALLERY, 3 Maja 11

THE EXHIBITION

I was born in Hanoi, Vietnam. It was a coincidence to come to photography after looking at the pictures on the internet and I wondered how the photographers were able to shoot like that. Think about it, I started with my camera and set off to explore the beautiful scenery of my country. Over time, embracing different shooting techniques and angles, I realize that a high angle (drone) always brings new things to photos. Every time I have free time, I go from North to South of my country to collect my favorite pictures in daily life of people or landscapes. All gives me emotions that are hard to describe.

Pham Huy Trung

Photographer based in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam and mainly focus on daily life and landscape photography. Started with a camera in 2016 and getting some awards: Sony World Photo Award 2018, 2019, 2020; Winner in the Hipae Drone Photo Contest 2021; Award winer in the  Skypixel Photo Contest 2017, 2018; 35 awards 2018/2019: 1st in Drone category and 1st in top photographer in Vietnam.
Exhibited in Poland for the first time.

Artem Tulhynskyi (Ukraine)

Observation Camera

Exhibition: HISTORICAL MUSEUM in Bielsko-Biała, STARA FABRYKA, pl. Żwirki i Wigury 8

Meeting with the Artist: AUDITORIUM OF WSA, Modrzewskiego 12 – AUTHORS’ MARATHON, 13th October, 4:25 p.m.

THE EXHIBITION

In my exhibition The Surveillance Camera you can see the shots, making which I was trying to feel the rythm of the street, totally dissolve in the surrounding, to watch it, shoot it on my camera, not interfering with what was happening around. I want my viewers to think outside the box, not limiting themselves with standard questions, like “What did the author mean?” and “Why did he make this shot?”. I want them to stop for a while instead, look at the photos and make up their own conclusions.
I make my photos mostly in my native Nikopol, a small industrial town, located near Kakhovskoe Reservoir.
I love to shoot near the water, close to the town dam and the public beach. Such places fill me with some special energy. When I go out, I never know what picture I will take, I even don’t know if I will take my camera out at all. And this is what I especially love about street photography.

Artem Tulhynskyi

I was born, grew up and live in Nikopol, Ukraine.

In 2009 I received a Master’s degree in Law, having graduated from Institute for the Training of Professional Judges of the Odessa National Law Academy. I used to work as an assistant judge, and now I’m administrating an online News public.
Photography has been my hobby since 2012. I work in various genres, such as picture story, street portrait, and sometimes sceneries.
I’ve been a participant of several national and international photography contests.
I am the finalist of The Miami Street Photography Festival (MSPF) 2019, LensCulture B&W Photography Awards 2019, London Street Photography Festival 2020.Also I was commended by the jury of Sony World Photography Awards 2018.

Artem Tulhynskyi (Ukraine)

Observation Camera

Exhibition: HISTORICAL MUSEUM in Bielsko-Biała, STARA FABRYKA, pl. Żwirki i Wigury 8

Meeting with the Artist: AUDITORIUM OF WSA, Modrzewskiego 12 – AUTHORS’ MARATHON, 13th October, 4:25 p.m.

THE EXHIBITION

In my exhibition The Surveillance Camera you can see the shots, making which I was trying to feel the rythm of the street, totally dissolve in the surrounding, to watch it, shoot it on my camera, not interfering with what was happening around. I want my viewers to think outside the box, not limiting themselves with standard questions, like “What did the author mean?” and “Why did he make this shot?”. I want them to stop for a while instead, look at the photos and make up their own conclusions.
I make my photos mostly in my native Nikopol, a small industrial town, located near Kakhovskoe Reservoir.
I love to shoot near the water, close to the town dam and the public beach. Such places fill me with some special energy. When I go out, I never know what picture I will take, I even don’t know if I will take my camera out at all. And this is what I especially love about street photography.

Artem Tulhynskyi

I was born, grew up and live in Nikopol, Ukraine.

In 2009 I received a Master’s degree in Law, having graduated from Institute for the Training of Professional Judges of the Odessa National Law Academy. I used to work as an assistant judge, and now I’m administrating an online News public.
Photography has been my hobby since 2012. I work in various genres, such as picture story, street portrait, and sometimes sceneries.
I’ve been a participant of several national and international photography contests.
I am the finalist of The Miami Street Photography Festival (MSPF) 2019, LensCulture B&W Photography Awards 2019, London Street Photography Festival 2020.Also I was commended by the jury of Sony World Photography Awards 2018.

Artem Tulhynskyi (Ukraine)

Observation Camera

Exhibition: HISTORICAL MUSEUM in Bielsko-Biała, STARA FABRYKA, pl. Żwirki i Wigury 8

Meeting with the Artist: AUDITORIUM OF WSA, Modrzewskiego 12 – AUTHORS’ MARATHON, 13th October, 4:25 p.m.

THE EXHIBITION

In my exhibition The Surveillance Camera you can see the shots, making which I was trying to feel the rythm of the street, totally dissolve in the surrounding, to watch it, shoot it on my camera, not interfering with what was happening around. I want my viewers to think outside the box, not limiting themselves with standard questions, like “What did the author mean?” and “Why did he make this shot?”. I want them to stop for a while instead, look at the photos and make up their own conclusions.
I make my photos mostly in my native Nikopol, a small industrial town, located near Kakhovskoe Reservoir.
I love to shoot near the water, close to the town dam and the public beach. Such places fill me with some special energy. When I go out, I never know what picture I will take, I even don’t know if I will take my camera out at all. And this is what I especially love about street photography.

Artem Tulhynskyi

I was born, grew up and live in Nikopol, Ukraine.

In 2009 I received a Master’s degree in Law, having graduated from Institute for the Training of Professional Judges of the Odessa National Law Academy. I used to work as an assistant judge, and now I’m administrating an online News public.
Photography has been my hobby since 2012. I work in various genres, such as picture story, street portrait, and sometimes sceneries.
I’ve been a participant of several national and international photography contests.
I am the finalist of The Miami Street Photography Festival (MSPF) 2019, LensCulture B&W Photography Awards 2019, London Street Photography Festival 2020.Also I was commended by the jury of Sony World Photography Awards 2018.

ACCOMPANYING EXHIBITIONS IN 2019 (entrance free)

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